Remote Acces Electronic

CONSER CATALOGING MANUAL Fall 2004
Module 31
Remote Access
Electronic Serials
(Online Serials)
Contents
31.1. Introduction
31.1.1. What is a remote access electronic serial?
31.1.2. Why catalog online serials with AACR2 and MARC 21?
31.1.3. Electronic reproductions
| 31.1.4. Multiple document formats and access methods
31.2. Decisions to make before providing access to online serials
31.2.1. What resource is being cataloged and how is it issued?
31.2.2. Serial or integrating resource?
31.2.3. Access to online versions
A. CONSER single record option (non-cataloging approach: giving access through
the print/original record)
B. Separate records: the aggregator neutral record
31.2.4. MARC 21 format and fixed field coding
31.3. Basis of description and chief source of information
31.3.1. Basis of description
31.3.2. Determining the chief source of information
31.3.3. Multiple providers of an online serial: which version should be used for the
description?
31.3.4. Citing the source of title proper
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CONSER CATALOGING MANUAL Fall 2004
31.4. Main and added entries
31.4.1. Main entry
31.4.2. Added entries
31.5. Uniform titles (created according to LCRI 25.5B)
31.6. Title statement (field 245)
31.6.1. Title proper
31.6.2. General material designation (GMD)
31.6.3. Statement of responsibility
31.7. Variant titles and title added entries (fields 246, 730, 740)
31.8. File characteristics (field 256)
31.9. Numbering (fields 362, 500)
31.10. Edition statement (field 250)
31.11. Publication, distribution, etc. area (field 260)
31.12. Physical description (field 300)
31.13. Series statement and series added entries (fields 4XX/8XX)
31.14. Notes
31.14.1. Restrictions on access (field 506)
31.14.2. Numbering peculiarities (field 515)
31.14.3. Type of electronic resource or data (field 516)
| 31.14.4. System requirements (field 538, System details)
31.14.5. Mode of access (field 538)
31.14.6. Information about documentation (field 556)
| 31.14.7. Other physical medium (field 530)
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31.15. Electronic location and access (field 856)
31.15.1. Description
A. Multiple locations
B. Multiple locations within a site
C. Mirror sites
D. File formats
| 31.15.2. Uses of field 856 in CONSER records
31.15.3. Construction and coding
31.15.4. Volatility of access information
31.15.5. PURLs in CONSER records
31.16. Linking relationships
31.16.1 Multiple linking relationships
31.17. Subject headings and classification
31.18. Changes that require the creation of new records
| 31.18.1. Create successive entry records
| 31.18.2. Successive records cannot be created
| A. Updating existing records
| B. Creating a new record
31.19. ISSN for online serials
31.20. Record examples
| 31.20.1. Born digital e-serial (there is no print version)
| 31.20.2. Aggregator-neutral record
| 31.20.3. Single-record approach
| 31.20.4. Online version preceded by an earlier title
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CONSER CATALOGING MANUAL Fall 2004
This module will discuss:
C Cataloging of electronic serials which are accessed remotely by computer
C Sources of information for descriptive cataloging
C Areas where the cataloging is similar and where it differs from that of print serials
C CONSER cataloging guidelines for online versions of printed serials, including policies
on the aggregator-neutral record
Module 31. Remote access electronic serials (online serials)
Remote access electronic serials are those serials available via the Internet and other networks.
They are also referred to as online serials, electronic serials and e-serials throughout this module.
Except for “single-record approach” guidelines in 31.2.3, instructions in this module concern
creation of separate records for remote access electronic serials. CONSER policies for record
creation and modification are reflected in the text and include guidelines developed in 2003 for
the aggregator-neutral record. Many CONSER members and LC staff contributed to the revision
and review of this module in 2003, their comments and suggestions were invaluable and are very
much appreciated.
[In the version of this document posted on the CONSER Web site, the
References and Definitions sections have been moved to the end]
31.1. Introduction
31.1.1 What is a remote access electronic serial?
A remote access electronic serial is a continuing resource that is accessed “via computer
networks.” It is issued in a succession of discrete parts usually bearing numbering, and has no
predetermined conclusion (AACR2). This is in contrast to a direct access electronic resource
which is issued on a physical carrier such as CD-ROM, floppy disk or diskette. The terms
“electronic serial,” “e-serial,” “online serial,” and “remote access serial” are used in this text
interchangeably for serials issued on the World Wide Web, via email, ftp, etc. (See also CCM
31.2 for distinguishing serials and integrating resources).
Though many online serials are “born-digital,” created and existing only in a digital format, the
majority of electronic serials cataloged by CONSER libraries are online versions of print
publications available on the World Wide Web. Online versions are made available by many
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CONSER CATALOGING MANUAL Fall 2004
| providers, including publishers, aggregators, distributors, vendors, secondary publishers, and
libraries involved in digitization projects. (The term “providers” will be used throughout this text
to refer to the broad range of organizations that provide digitized text of print serials). In 2003,
CONSER changed its policy on record creation for titles offered in multiple provider packages
and developed the concept of the “aggregator-neutral record.” Guidelines for creating
aggregator-neutral records are intended to be applicable to creating a record for any e-serial,
including those that don’t have a print equivalent and free serials that aren’t part of a commercial
aggregation (e.g. government documents).
A further discussion of the background and goals of the aggregator-neutral record appears in
CCM 31.2.3B. Information to include or exclude in the aggregator-neutral record is specified
throughout this module under field by field instructions. Guidelines for the aggregator-neutral
record and CCM citations for specific fields are given in a table in 31.2.3B.
31.1.2 Why catalog online serials with AACR2 and MARC 21?
Institutions use several methods to provide access to electronic serials; one method is to create
AACR2/MARC 21 records for online serials in the OPAC. Other methods include A-Z listings of
electronic resources and links to article and citation databases through link resolvers. New
products and tools are evolving and institutions often use a combination of these, including
OPAC records, to provide access to digitized content.
Providing records for online versions of a resource in the OPAC is a way to allow users to find
all related formats of the resource (e.g. print, CD-ROM, and online) in one place. OPAC users
can find related records for a resource that has changed from print to online when both are
cataloged. Searching for resources in the OPAC is enhanced with controlled name, series, and
subject headings provided by catalogers. Links between OPAC records, serials management
systems, citation databases and linking services enhance browsing of contents and delivery of
journal articles. Since commercially packaged resources require subscription fees, it’s
| appropriate to create bibliographic records associated with holdings and library acquisition
records in order to track expenditures.
This module describes current CONSER policies for giving access to an online serial through a
catalog record. Basic steps for providing access are:
• Determine if the resource is a serial, integrating resource, or monograph.
• Decide whether the single record approach or a separate catalog record approach will be
used.
• If a separate record is used, determine and record the basic bibliographic information in order
| to accurately identify and describe the serial.
• Determine the access points needed for retrieval of the catalog record.
• Determine and record the means by which the serial itself can be accessed online.
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CONSER CATALOGING MANUAL Fall 2004
31.1.3. Electronic reproductions
LCRI 1.11A, issued in 2000, allows a library to use a record for the print version to clone a new
record for the reproduction, similar to the approach used for reproduction microforms. In 2002,
CONSER members voted to implement provisions of LCRI 1.11A when an electronic item is
clearly a reproduction according to the LCRI. In-house digitizations and digitized sets of older
serials, such as the American Periodical Series are examples of when this RI could reasonably be
applied.
Making distinctions between simultaneous “versions” and “reproductions” is sometimes difficult
with digitized print serials. The LCRI describes reproductions as “usually made for such reasons
as the original’s limited availability, remote location, poor condition, high cost, or restricted
utility.” In case of doubt whether or not a resource is a reproduction, the LCRI says not to
consider it a reproduction.
Until further guidelines are developed (for example, the question of whether or not to use a
| uniform title for electronic reproductions of serials is being considered), CONSER members are
generally not making distinctions between digital reproductions and simultaneous versions.
Except in limited cases, CONSER treats electronic versions of print format serials as
simultaneous versions and bases the description on the version itself.
31.1.4. Multiple document formats and access methods
Electronic serials may be issued in different “file” or “document” formats in order to meet the
needs of users. Many online serials provide an HTML version to enhance online viewing and a
PDF format to provide high quality printouts of articles. Graphic, sound, and video files may
also be included as a part of an e-serial. A serial may be available in one, all, or a combination
of these formats, and over time, the available formats may change.
According to CONSER policy, do not create separate records for a serial offered in different file
formats. CONSER policy is to create one record and make notes on file format; for common
formats (HTML, XML, PDF) omit format information from the bibliographic description. For
unusual file formats, see CCM 31.14.3.
Some online serials are available through multiple access methods, e-mail and simultaneously
through the Web for example, or simultaneously from multiple Web sites. These multiple access
| methods and locations are recorded on the same record in multiple 856 fields. See CCM 31.15
for further information on recording location information in the 856 field.
31.2. Decisions to make before providing access to online serials
31.2.1 What resource is being cataloged and how is it issued?
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CONSER CATALOGING MANUAL Fall 2004
LCRI 1.0 presents two questions that need to be answered before cataloging. What resource is
being cataloged, and how is the resource issued? The first question refers to the fact that a Web
site may offer many different resources, including access to a variety of serials, monographs, and
integrating resources. The cataloger should be clear on which resource has been selected for
cataloging. Does the cataloger’s institution require a record for the entire Web site or has the
institution selected a serial residing on the Web site for cataloging?
31.2.2 Serial or integrating resource?
The second question refers to how the resource is issued (see CCM Module 0: Introduction to
continuing resources for a detailed explanation). The term integrating resource was introduced
with the 2002 revision of AACR2 and is defined as a bibliographic resource that is added to or
changed by means of updates that do not remain discrete and are integrated into the whole. Rules
for integrating entry are used to record current forms of the title and headings when they change.
An updating loose-leaf publication is cataloged according to the rules for integrating entry. In the
world of online resources, many Web sites and databases are integrating resources rather than
serials or monographs. Some examples include:
• Online public access catalogs or databases (e.g., OCLC WorldCat, ProQuest)
• Online services (e.g., DIALOG, America Online)
• World Wide Web home pages without designated parts (e.g., Serials in Cyberspace, LC Web
site)
• Discussion lists (e.g., SERIALST, AUTOCAT) unless the content is reformatted into
designated issues
Like online serials, online integrating resources are also continuing resources that change over
time. These resources, however, are updated with new content continuously and do not publish
separate designated issues with the new content. Since the cataloging rules for integrating
resources and serials differ, it is important for catalogers to make this distinction when first
examining the resource for cataloging.
A resource issued as a serial in paper format may be issued as an integrating resource in online
format. For example, a scientific society’s membership directory may be issued in paper as an
annually published serial with yearly designations. The online version may be a database that
allows members to update information continuously and does not display separate numbered
issues. Because there are no successive parts to the online version, it cannot be considered a
serial; since updates are integrated into the whole resource without discrete parts, it is considered
an integrating resource.
31.2.3. Access to online versions
This section documents CONSER policies for digitized versions of print and other format
serials:
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CONSER CATALOGING MANUAL Fall 2004
A. Non-cataloging approach: the CONSER single record option
B. Cataloging approach: the aggregator neutral record
A. CONSER single record option (non-cataloging approach: giving access through the
print/original record)
CONSER members may choose not to catalog online versions separately, but instead note the
existence and electronic location of the online version(s) in the record for the printed serial (or,
lacking that, in the record for another format, e.g., a CD-ROM serial). The following rules of
thumb give advice on when the single-record approach is a viable choice, but do not prohibit
application of the single-record approach in any case. The decision must be made by individual
| libraries, since it is not possible to require a library to catalog a particular online version and it is
independently valid to note facts about an online version in the record for different versions.
The principles behind the rules of thumb are: If the bibliographic record for the original version
(print, CD-ROM, etc.) provides sufficient access for the online version, no matter what the
differences are between the two, the single-record approach is a good alternative. If the desired
access points for the online and the original version differ, separate records may be more useful.
Separate records are always a permissible option.
•The single-record approach is considered most valid when the online version contains
sufficient full-text to be a satisfactory substitute and has no significant additional content.
That is, the single-record approach works best when the original and online versions can be
considered equivalent manifestations.
•The single-record approach is also commonly applied when the online version lacks full-text
or has only selected full-text from the original, and is therefore not considered to be an
adequate substitute. The online site may not be considered worth cataloging separately in
many such cases, so its existence and electronic location are noted on the record for the
original, with appropriate indication of its relationship to the original version.
• Separate records are preferred when the online version has significant additional content not
present in the original. The choice of a separate-record approach in such cases means that
the versions are not considered equivalent and the difference of the online version from the
original is significant to users.
MARC21 coding in the single-record and separate record approaches compared:
Single-record approach
In the record for the original:
• Code 008/22 (“form of original item”) and 008/23 (“form of item”) as correct for the
original, not for the online version
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CONSER CATALOGING MANUAL Fall 2004
• Note the availability of the online version in field 530 (see also CCM 31.14.7);
• Add a 740 (2nd indicator blank) title added entry or 7XX author/title added entry when
the title of the online version differs
• Provide the location of the online version in field 856
• If a separate ISSN has been assigned to the online serial but a separate record doesn’t
exist, add field 776 with subfields $t and $x (and/or subfields $a and $s if appropriate)
• Optionally, an electronic resource 007 field may be added for the online version
| Do not add an electronic resource 006 field for the online version.
(See CCM 31.20.3 for the record for ARC News (Redlands, Calif.).)
Separate record approach
In the record for the original:
• Note the availability of the online version in field 530 (see also CCM 31.14.7);
• Add a 730 title added entry or 7XX author/title added entry when the title of the
online version differs
• Link to the online record with field 776, and;
• Provide the location of the online version in field 856 (if not already present in the
record).
In the record for the online version,
• Describe the digital version using all appropriate fields;
• Add a 730 title added entry or 7XX author/title added entry when the title of the
original differs
• Link to the original version’s record using field 776, and;
• Give appropriate 856 fields
B. Separate records: the aggregator neutral record
CONSER implemented the aggregator-neutral record policy in July 2003. The policy focuses on
providing a bibliographic description of the serial as issued by the publisher or other original
source of the content (such as a scholarly society). The record representing the online version
contains information applicable to all versions being distributed by all providers. The practices
for the aggregator-neutral record were intended, as much as possible, to be applicable to all
online serials, whether or not they are represented in e-serial packages, and whether or not they
have a print counterpart. Certain elements may not be appropriate for some e-serials; for
example, notes which refer to a print version would not be applicable to a serial which does not
have a print counterpart.
Although the policy calls for the creation of one record for an electronic serial issued in multiple
aggregations, there may be exceptions that will require separate records. If the cataloger
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CONSER CATALOGING MANUAL Fall 2004
| determines that the serials involved are really different works (e.g., content is significantly
different), separate records should be created.
The aggregator-neutral record does not contain information specific to any one particular
provider, with the exception of citing the package and format upon which the record was based.
Provider names are not added to uniform titles as qualifiers, given as name headings or
| mentioned in issuing body notes. Notes about access restrictions, format, or system requirements
specific to particular providers also are not given. As CONSER catalogers consolidate existing
multiple records for an online serial, the URL of all versions will be given on the remaining
record.
The aggregator-neutral record was developed after surveying CONSER and non-CONSER
librarians on the need for an OPAC record representing the online version of a print title.
Librarians told of problems with selecting and editing records from the national database to
customize for local OPACs. They needed a simpler record, adaptable to local access methods
through use of record sets, serials management systems, and databases that provide full text or
citations to serial content.
CONSER is applying the policy to titles in e-serial packages that present whole issues of
digitized serials rather than to databases that are focused on article delivery. Complete issue eserial
packages provide the best basis for creating a catalog record. The PCC Third Task Group
| on Journals in Aggregator Databases helped develop a macro that will automate the creation of
| records for titles in article based databases. The following table summarizes cataloging decisions
made for the aggregator-neutral record and refers to the section of CCM Module 31 where more
detailed information and field by field examples can be found. Record consolidation guidelines
are presented at the end of the table.
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CONSER CATALOGING MANUAL Fall 2004
Guidelines for Record Creation and Record Consolidation: Aggregator-Neutral Record
Creating an original record CCM
Which provider
site is the
description
based on?
Preferred list:
* Publisher’s site when it contains the full text
* Host or archiving site. Prefer this site over the publisher’s
site when it contains the first issue and publisher’s site does not.
| * In choosing between sites that present titles involved in a
| title change and those that don’t, prefer the site that presents
| both titles (see CCM 31.18.2)
* Record for the print.
* Aggregations and databases which are article based and do
not maintain issue integrity.
31.3.4,
| 31.18
008 Code as for any online serial. Use the beginning date of the print
or original format as the beginning date of publication, if cited
in the 362 field.
31.2.3
022 Give the ISSN of the electronic in $a; give the ISSN of the print
in $y
31.19
130/240 * Assign as for any serial, per LCRI 25.5B
* If the print format record has a uniform title, use the same
qualifier as the basis for the qualifier of the online serial,
whether or not the qualifying data relates to the online serial.
* Do not use the name of the aggregator as a uniform title
qualifier.
31.5
245 Record the title from the earliest available issue on the preferred
source.
31.6.1
246 Make added entries for variants on other provider versions with
the wording:
246 1 $i Issues from some providers have title: $a [Title]
31.7
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CONSER CATALOGING MANUAL Fall 2004
260 $a, $b, $c Record the first named place and publisher in the first or earliest
available issue online. The place/publisher should be applicable
to all online versions and thus, should not reflect a particular
digitizer or provider of an aggregation.
$c. When first or last issue is recorded in 362 0, give first/last
date of publication as found in that issue.
31.11
| 362 Record beginning and ending numbering or dates per rules and
CONSER practice. Do not use a “Coverage as of” note. If the
| first issue is not in hand, give the beginning numbering or date
of the print or other original format in a 362 1 note, if available:
362 1 Print began with: Vol. 3, no. 1 (Jan. 1984).
31.9
440, 490, 8XX Some aggregator names have been treated as series titles in
series authority records. Do not record these as series statements
in the aggregator neutral record.
31.13
500 DBO, LIC Record source of title proper and latest issue consulted notes as
usual. However, also add the file format (if there are multiple
formats) and the provider version used for description. See
examples in CCM.
| 31.3.4,
31.9
500/550 Do not note aggregators as the digitizer. 31.4.2
506 Do not use, unless restrictions apply to all versions and formats
of the serial. An example is a “classified” government document
for which access is always restricted. If specific access
restrictions are considered useful in the CONSER record, give in
$z of field 856.
31.14.1
516 In general, do not use this note, particularly for notes such as
“Text (electronic journal).”
31.14.3
538 Provide a mode of access note, such as “Mode of access:
Internet” or “Mode of access: World Wide Web.”
Do not give system requirements notes unless the requirements
are particularly unusual and would relate to all versions.
31.14.4
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CONSER CATALOGING MANUAL Fall 2004
710/730 Do not make added entries for the name of aggregator or
provider.
31.4
856 Give the applicable URLs for serial packages that present issues
of the serial (i.e. those that preserve issue integrity). Do not give
URLs for databases that are article-based, unless that database
served as the basis of the description. If contents are split among
multiple sites, give the appropriate URL for each with the issue
coverage data in $3.
31.15
Record Consolidation and Deleting Duplicates
If multiple records exist for a title describing it as a part of several aggregator packages, one
record should be selected for CONSER authentication and others reported for deletion.
* Select one record to maintain: prefer a CONSER record if one is available. If there are
multiple CONSER records, prefer a record authenticated by NSDP or ISSN Canada (see also
CEG C7.3 for additional guidance on record selection).
* Add the URL of the aggregation for which you are providing access and/or copy 856
fields from the records you are reporting for deletion and record them on the record you are
keeping.
* Remove fields that are aggregator specific, e.g. 710/730 or 440 for aggregator names;
notes which only apply to one aggregator.
* Authenticate the record if it is not a CONSER record; report the other records as
duplicates.
31.2.4. MARC 21 format and fixed field coding
Almost all electronic serials are textual in nature; therefore code “a” for “language material” in
the leader/06 type of record code is used for most online e-serials. A continuing resource 008
field is used to code serial characteristics and an electronic resource 006 field is added to code
electronic fixed field elements. The definition of type of record code “m” was changed in the late
1990s and some records coded “m” under the old definition may still exist on the utilities.
| CONSER catalogers convert them to type of record code “a” if appropriate. (See CEG Type of
record (leader/06). Other leader/06 codes and 008 fields are used with non-textual online serials;
for those, see the CONSER Editing Guide.
Additionally, serial format records for textual electronic serials are identified and distinguished
by a code indicating that the item cataloged is in electronic form. Code “s” for “electronic” in
the serial 008 was implemented in spring 2000 for “form of item” (008/23) and “form of original
item” (008/22). It is used in the same way that codes for microfilm and microfiche are currently
used in those 008 bytes.
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CONSER CATALOGING MANUAL Fall 2004
For the most part, CONSER considers electronic versions of a print publication to be a
simultaneous version. In the limited situations where it can be determined that the electronic
version is a reproduction of the original, it is coded accordingly:
Form of item= Electronic 008/23 (Form of item): s
Original form= Print 008/22 (Form of original): #
If the form of the original item cannot be determined or if unsure, the codes are both coded “s”
for electronic. This is the approach used for current serials issued both in print and online
formats:
Form of item= Electronic 008/23 (Form of item): s
Original form=Unknown 008/22 (Form of original): s
OCLC added the new code “s” to the 008/23 of existing records in spring 2000. For further
details on fixed field construction, see the CONSER Editing Guide.
Code the fixed field beginning date based on data recorded in the 362 field. For aggregatorneutral
records, this may mean that the beginning date of the print version is recorded as the
beginning date, if this information has been provided in an unformatted 362.
31.3. Basis of description and chief source of information
| The basis of description for an online serial is determined according to AACR2 12.0B1. The chief
source is selected according to AACR2 9.0B1. Deciding which version to use for the description
in an aggregator-neutral record is done according to a preferred list given in 31.3.4 below.
Commercial Web sites for scholarly serials often have a recognizable structure for presenting
serial content. It is common to find a subset of pages in these sites devoted to individual serials
where the title, publisher, and available issues are listed clearly and in a straight forward manner.
In other types of online serials the sources of bibliographic information may not be as
standardized and the cataloger needs to examine the site carefully to find appropriate sources for
transcription.
31.3.1 Basis of description
According to AACR2 12.0B1, the description of a serial is based on the first issue or part or,
lacking this, on the earliest available issue or part. The cataloger should prefer to use a source
associated with the first or earliest issue over a source associated with the whole serial (e.g.
home page or other associated pages) or with a range of issues.
Generally prefer to record the title, edition, numbering, and publication information from the
first issue or part. Other parts of the resource may be consulted for other areas of the description
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CONSER CATALOGING MANUAL Fall 2004
if needed. Online serials sometimes do not give all of the necessary information in the first issue.
For example, sometimes full publication information is given on pages other than the actual
issues, therefore a page such as a home page or “about” file may be the source for this area of the
description.
A problem, also encountered with CD-ROM serials, is the possibility for a serial to “go online”
and subsequently provide electronic access to back issues that were originally issued in print.
Digitized versions of long published print titles are typically made available beginning with a
recent span of issues rather than the first issue; so in these cases the basis of description is of
| necessity the earliest issue available online (see also 31.9). The description on an existing
separate record can be backed up to the first issue when it is available or can be backed up to a
| newly available earlier issue when there are variations to record, but isn’t required. (See CEG
B4.3.4).
31.3.2. Determining the chief source of information
AACR2 9.0B1 states that the chief source of information for an electronic resource is the
resource itself. The chief source is listed as the prescribed source of information for title, edition,
publication, and series area. Prescribed sources for other areas such as notes and ISSN are “any
source.”
Information should be taken from formally presented sources, preferably associated with the first
or earliest issue. For online serials sources include:
• table of contents of the first or earliest issue or contents listing available volumes
• journal home pages
• navigational menu bars or screens
• HTML header title (as presented in the title bar of the Web browser)
• titles presented in conjunction with the issue as with graphic “cover” images, or caption titles
| as with a PDF newsletter.
When the information in sources varies in degree of fullness, prefer the source that provides the
most complete information. Further examples of formally presented sources in AACR2 9.0B1
include: title screens, main menus, initial displays of information, home pages, file headers and
information from meta tags embedded in the document.
When different information is presented in different sources, the question arises as to which page
is the chief source. Review the earliest issue and other files that contain formal presentations of
bibliographic information. The source of the title proper should be the most complete source of
information associated with the first or earliest issue. Note any variant bibliographic information
and the source(s) from which it is taken.
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CONSER CATALOGING MANUAL Fall 2004
Title changes in the print version of a serial are not always clearly identified when issues are
mounted on the Web. Although the content of earlier (or later) titles is available on the Web site,
it may be prominently identified by a different title, often the most recent. Where changes in the
print title are not displayed prominently, a less prominent source may be selected as the source
of title. A running title appearing on a PDF or scanned image of an article can be used as a
source of title in these cases and is useful in providing records for the online version that
correspond to records for the print version, citations in databases, and URLs used in link
resolvers. Providing online records that correspond to the print version is desirable when it is
practical and can be done under current rules.
E-serial records that correspond to print title changes cannot always be created, however. There
will be records for print version title changes made under earlier rules that would not be created
under current rules; title changes for the online version should only be considered under the
current rules. Local cataloging resources may not always be available to accurately identify and
create records for multiple, “hidden” title changes in a very large back file of digitized titles.
Also, there are cases where the content of the earlier serial appears on the Web site, but the title
does not appear at all (see the provisions of LCRIs 12.0B1 and 12.7B4.2, and CCM 31.18 for
using an integrating entry approach for these situations).
Only bracket information that is taken from a source external to the resource, such as a directory
on a server. Record designations, publishers, etc. without brackets, regardless of the file
structure or the location of the information within the resource.
The description of remote access electronic serials begs for both flexibility and the exercise of
cataloger judgment in determining the appropriate sources of information. When in doubt,
record what seems reasonable, remembering that the most important thing is to accurately
identify and provide access to the resource. The more non-traditional the description, the more
necessary it becomes to make explicit notes that explain the sources of information used.
31.3.3. Multiple providers of an online serial: which version should be used for the
description?
A digitized serial offered in multiple provider packages requires another cataloging decision:
which version will be used as the basis of description to represent all versions of the serial in an
aggregator-neutral record? The following list in preferred order is offered as general guidance to
making decisions. Individual catalogers may need to use a particular version because they do not
have access to other sources in the list. Other factors such as institutional policies and variations
in how the title is presented by various distributors, may also influence the source selected.
• Publisher’s site when it contains the full text
• Host or archiving site. Prefer this site over the publisher’s site when it contains the first issue
and the publisher’s site does not. A host site usually preserves the original publisher’s content
(e.g., publisher logos and statements are preserved); examples include Ingenta and Highwire
Press. An archive site also preserves the original publisher’s content; an example is JSTOR
Remote access electronic serials. Module 31, page 17
1In general, do not add the date viewed to the source of title note in existing records.
CONSER CATALOGING MANUAL Fall 2004
| • In choosing between sites that present titles involved in a title change and those that don’t,
| prefer the site that presents both titles (see CCM 31.18)
• Record for the print
• Aggregations and databases which are article based and do not maintain issue integrity
Cite the provider version used as the basis of description as a part of the source of title note. Also
cite the provider in the latest issue consulted note if it is different from the provider cited in the
source of title note (see below).
31.3.4. Citing the source of title proper
Always give in a note the source of title for an online serial, according to AACR2 9.7.B3. Use the
first designated part or issue of the serial if it has a source with a formal title presentation that
can be considered the chief source of information. To cite the source of title, use a term that is as
specific as possible to describe the source, e.g. “title from table of contents screen,” “title from
HTML header,” etc. in preference to a more general term such as the phrase “title from title
screen.” In the absence of a formal title presentation on the earliest available issue, be as
detailed as necessary in order to make clear how the title was constructed, using language from
the publication or other standard or common terms. If cataloging from a printout of the online
file, state so in the source of title note.
500 ## $a Title from printout of table of contents screen.
Give also, in new records, the date viewed in parentheses following the source of title per
AACR2 9.7B22, because the title may not appear on individual issues and the information may
be susceptible to change.1 Generally, the date viewed given in the 500 note is not changed
unless the serial is redescribed for purposes of backing up the description to the first issue or for
some other reason. (See also, CCM 31.6, Title statement.)
Add the provider version selected for description to the title source statement and give the
particular file format used for the description if the serial was available in several formats at the
| site. Apply this to titles available from multiple distributors as well as born-digital serials.
500 ## $a Title from volume contents page (Ingenta Select, viewed July 15,
2003).
| 500 ## $a Title from PDF caption (publisher’s Web site, viewed Aug. 20,
2003).
| 500 ## $a Title from PDF running title (publisher’s Web site, viewed Dec.
24, 2002).
| 500 ## $a Title from table of contents page (Emerald, viewed Mar. 22,
2003).
| 500 ## $a Title from HTML header (Society for Information Technology Web
| site, viewed July 16, 1998).
Module 31, page 18 Remote access electronic serials
CONSER CATALOGING MANUAL Fall 2004
500 ## $a Title from publisher’s statement page on the World Wide Web
(publisher’s Web site, viewed Sept. 15, 2003).
500 ## $a Title from subject line of email header (viewed Jan. 8, 1998).
If the description is based on an issue other than the first, combine the “Description based on”
| and source of title notes in the 500 field (see CCM 8.1.1).
| 500 ## $a Description based on: July 1994; title from caption (publisher’s
| Web site, viewed July 14, 2003).
500 ## $a Description based on: Vol. 2, no. 2 (Apr. 1995); title from
table of contents (Ingenta, viewed Nov. 29, 2003).
31.4. Main and added entries
31.4.1. Main entry. Remote access serials can be entered under title, corporate body or
personal name entry according to AACR2 Chapter 21 and the relevant LCRIs, as outlined in
CCM Module 4. Although a majority of remote access serials are entered under title, many
annual reports, directories and other serials that qualify for corporate main entry, according to
AACR2 21.1B2 and the LCRIs, are also available in electronic form. Similarly, a growing
number of individuals are also distributing personal author newsletters via the Internet. For
guidance, see LCRI 21.1A2 and CCM Module 4.
31.4.2. Added entries. Make added entries for any personal authors or corporate bodies,
associated with the creation and issuance of the online serial if they are named prominently or
there is evidence in the serial that indicates responsibility for the intellectual content of the work.
If their names do not appear in any of the transcribed areas of the description (title and statement
of responsibility; publication, distribution, etc. areas), supply information describing their
| relationship to the serial in a 500 “personal author”or a 550 “issuing body” note.
Do not give added entries for aggregator names in the aggregator-neutral record.
31.5. Uniform titles (created according to LCRI 25.5B)
Create a uniform title for a remote access serial, according to LCRI 25.5B, when one or more of
the following conditions exists:
1. Its title matches that of its print (or other physical medium) counterpart:
130 0# $a Emerging infectious diseases (Online)
245 10 $a Emerging infectious diseases $h [electronic resource] : $b EID.
| 776 1# $t Emerging infectious diseases $x 1080-6040 $w (DLC) 96648093 $w
(OCoLC)31848353
2. Its title matches that of another unrelated serial or series in the database:
130 0# $a Etc. magazine (New York, N.Y.)
Remote access electronic serials. Module 31, page 19
CONSER CATALOGING MANUAL Fall 2004
245 10 $a Etc. magazine $h [electronic resource].
245 00 $a Etc. magazine.
260 ## $a McAllen, Tex. : …
3. It is published in various editions (see CCM 31.10):
130 0# $a Academics in the news (National ed.)
245 10 $a Academics in the news $h [electronic resource].
130 0# $a Academics in the news (International ed.)
245 10 $a Academics in the news $h [electronic resource].
4. It was formerly published in print (or other physical format such as CD-ROM) and changed
to online:
| 130 0# $a Iowa farm statistics for … (Online)
245 10 $a Iowa farm statistics for … $h [electronic resource].
780 00 $t Iowa farm statistics for …
See CCM 5.2.1. for the basic principles of assigning a uniform title. The principles include the
| instruction: Do not go back and add a uniform title to a record that has already been cataloged. If
| you are cataloging or editing all of the titles at the same time, however, a uniform title may be
| created for each. Sometimes a cataloger has added a uniform title to both the online and print
| records because both versions were “in hand.” A revision of LCRI 25.5B in 2003 contains the
| instruction to “generally avoid use of the terms “print” and “text” as qualifiers because they are
| vague and there is not a consensus as to their appropriate use.” The LCRI instructs the cataloger
| to prefer adding a qualifier to the heading for the physical medium that isn’t printed text on paper
| “(even if that means assigning a qualifier to a heading in an existing record).” Many CONSER
| records contain the term print and do not need to be changed or revised.
Since CONSER treats most electronic versions of print serials as simultaneous editions rather
than electronic reproductions, a uniform title qualified by the physical medium is used if the
online and print version titles conflict. According to the LCRI, uniform titles are not assigned to
| reproductions. In selecting a qualifier, the term “online” may be sufficient to differentiate from a
print or CD-ROM counterpart. If the print serial has its own uniform title, use that uniform title
and add a second qualifier.
130 0# $a Migration news (Davis, Calif.)
130 0# $a Migration news (Davis, Calif. : Online)
Prefer to use the uniform title of the print version as the basis of the uniform title of the online
version, even if the place of publication appearing on the online version is different from the
place used as part of the qualifier for the print:
Record for the print:
130 0# $a Journal of online publishing (New York, N.Y.)
Module 31, page 20 Remote access electronic serials
CONSER CATALOGING MANUAL Fall 2004
Record for the e-serial:
130 0# $a Journal of online publishing (New York, N.Y. : Online)
260 ## $a Chicago : $b …
[The e-serial is actually published in Chicago]
Do not use the name of the provider as part of the uniform title qualifier.
It is possible that both the online and the print versions will be entered under a corporate body or
conference name and a uniform title will be entered in the 240 field:
Print version:
110 1# $a Canada. $b Defence Research and Development Branch.
245 10 $a Annual report / $c Defence Research and Development Branch.
Online version:
110 1# $a Canada. $b Defence Research and Development Branch.
240 10 $a Annual report (Online)
245 10 $a Annual report $h [electronic resource] / $c Defence Research and
Development Branch.
31.6. Title statement (field 245)
31.6.1. Title proper. Transcribe the title according to the rules found in AACR2 Chapters 1, 9,
and 12, and the directions in CCM Module 6. Determine the title proper based on information
taken from the chief source (see CCM 31.3). Prefer a source associated with the first or earliest
issue, focusing on formally presented statements. Use other sources such as the home page,
menu listings, etc. if no formal source associated with the first or earliest issue can be found. The
running title on a PDF article can be used when earlier titles are not displayed prominently on
| the Web site. This enables the creation of a record for the online version that corresponds to
records for print title changes (see 31.3.3). Sometimes the cataloger will need to supply a title
within brackets per AACR2 9.0B1 and 9.7B3.
Per AACR2 1.1B1 do not record words that serve as an introduction and are not intended to be
part of the title, such as “Welcome to.” The title may be noted and treated as a variant title per
| AACR2 1.1B1 and 1.7B4.
245 00 $a Python journal $h [electronic resource].
246 1# $i Title on home page appears as: $a Welcome to python journal
| 500 ## $a Title from home page (viewed Apr. 9, 2002).
31.6.2. General material designation (GMD). Include the GMD “electronic resource” in
brackets in subfield $h following the title proper. Do not use the GMD “interactive multimedia”
for serials that meet the definition found in the ALA Guidelines for Bibliographic Description of
Interactive Multimedia.
Remote access electronic serials. Module 31, page 21
CONSER CATALOGING MANUAL Fall 2004
245 00 $a Postmodern culture $h [electronic resource] : $b PMC.
245 00 $a Journal of physics. $n B, $p Atomic, molecular and optical
physics $h [electronic resource].
31.6.3. Statement of responsibility. Record the statement of responsibility as part of the 245
field as prescribed in AACR2 1.1F and 12.1F. Record a statement of responsibility only when it
appears prominently in the item. In all other cases, record the information in field 550. If there
is no formal statement of responsibility, do not attempt to construct one; instead, make
appropriate notes for any other persons or bodies that appear in the text of the online file and are
deemed important for access.
31.7. Variant titles and title added entries (fields 246, 730, 740)
Online serials may contain variant titles on the home page or other locations. Such variants
include “at head of title” phrases, running titles, or abbreviated titles in header information or at
the end of the file. File or directory names constitute other legitimate variant titles if it may be
reasonably assumed that a user would search for the serial using those names. The title bar in
the Web browser displays the HTML title element as coded in the document. Such a title can be
recorded as a title variant or can help clarify the form of the title proper when presentation in the
chief source creates doubts.
Record all variant titles as specifically as possible, using field 246 subfield $i if the display
constants available for 246 indicators are not sufficient to generate an accurate note.
245 00 $a Emerging infectious diseases $h [electronic resource] : $b EID.
246 30 $a EID
245 00 $a Journal of extension $h [electronic resource].
246 1# $i Also known as: $a JOE
245 00 $a Effector online $h [electronic resource].
246 1# $i File name: $a EFFON
245 00 $a Word virtual $h [electronic resource].
246 1# $i Title in source code: $a WordVirtual.com
Multiple providers sometimes present the title of a digitized serial differently from one another.
For the aggregator-neutral record, give added entries for variations of the title presented by
different providers with the following introductory text:
| 246 1# $i Issues from some providers have title: $a [Title]
Make added entries for related works as necessary according to the instructions in CCM 7.5.2.
31.8. File characteristics (field 256)
Module 31, page 22 Remote access electronic serials
CONSER CATALOGING MANUAL Fall 2004
| [No longer valid in AACR2]
| Chapter 9, Area 3 was deleted in AACR2 2004 revision. Historically, the only terms used in this
area are: electronic data, electronic program(s), or electronic data and program(s). Since the
body of the serial record for an electronic resource makes it clear what type of file it is (usually
| text), CONSER practice was not to create a 256 field. In some instances, a 516 field may be
warranted (see CCM 31.14.3.).
31.9. Numbering (fields 362, 500)
Transcribe numbering (field 362) from the first issue of a remote access serial when available. If
the first issue is not available, construct an appropriate designation for use in a “Description
based on” note.
First issue available:
362 0# $a 1995/01-
First issue not available:
500 ## $a Description based on: Summer 1992; title from title screen
(publisher’s Web site, viewed July 15, 2002).
Take the numbering from the title source if it appears there; otherwise, take it from anywhere
within the file or files. For an emailed file, take the designation from the date of transmission
from the original sender (i.e., the publisher or distributor), if no other source is available.
If numbering is very difficult to locate or construct, add a “numbering peculiarities” note
| explaining the source for the designation (see also CCM 31.14.2).
500 ## $a Description based on: 1994; title from homepage index
listing (viewed June 8, 2000).
515 ## $a Numbering taken from text.
362 0# $a No. 1 (Jan. 1995)-
515 ## $a Numbering taken from introductory text found in README file.
When cataloging an online version of a printed serial, give a “description based on” note if the
| online version does not begin with the first issue of the printed version. Since providers vary in
the range of issues they offer online, the CONSER practice of giving a “coverage as of” was
discontinued when LCRI 12.7B10 was deleted in 2003. The beginning dates of the print version
may be given in a 362 1# field to provide justification for the fixed field beginning date:
Remote access electronic serials. Module 31, page 23
CONSER CATALOGING MANUAL Fall 2004
Dates: 1984, 9999
| 362 1# $a Print began with: Vol. 3, no. 1 (Jan. 1984).
Dates: 1999, 9999
362 1# $a Print began in 1999.
Coverage as of notes on existing records can be replaced with the beginning date of the print if
catalogers are entering the record to make other changes.
A latest issue consulted note is given per AACR2 12.7B23 if more than one issue has been
consulted. Cite the provider in the latest issue consulted note if it is different from the provider
| cited in the source of title note. Give the date viewed in parentheses following the source of title .
362 0# $a Feb. 2003-
| 500 ## $a Title from table of contents (publisher’s Web site, viewed
Oct. 22, 2003).
500 ## $a Latest issue consulted: May 2003 (viewed Oct. 22, 2003).
500 ## $a Description based on: Vol. 43, no. 1 (1994); title from
journal home page (Emerald, viewed July 28, 2003)
500 ## $a Latest issue consulted: Vol. 52, no. 9 (2003) (FirstSearch,
viewed Oct. 28, 2003).
31.10. Edition statement (field 250)
Like serials in print, electronic serials are issued in language, geographic, or special interest
editions. Treat such editions like all other serial editions (see CCM Module 9). A common
edition statement recorded in the 250 field on a record for an e-serial is “Web edition” that
distinguishes the print and online editions.
250 ## $a Web ed.
Sometimes it is not clear whether one record or multiple records should be used for language and
other types of editions appearing on a Web site. Are the editions separately numbered and
presented as separate publications within the Web site? The structure of the Web site may help
determine if they are separate resources or if they are intended to be used together as one
resource. Separate Web pages devoted to each edition at separate URLs provide separate sources
of information that could be used as the basis of multiple records. If the content is only available
from one Web page and URL, one record for the site may be more appropriate. It is sometimes
useful to consult records for print versions of the editions to determine if these were issued as
separate publications.
| Using a single record is helpful where text in different languages is available either from a single
| Web site or chief source or even if there is not a common page with links to both languages, as
| long as there are links from one language version to the other. In this case, the availability of the
text in different languages is given in a 546 note.
Module 31, page 24 Remote access electronic serials
CONSER CATALOGING MANUAL Fall 2004
546 ## $a Text available in English, French, and German.
In the example below, separate records were created because the larger Web site contained
discrete URLs for the editions, displayed separate edition statements, and provided separate chief
sources of information for the editions:
130 0# $a Time for kids online (World report ed.)
250 ## $a World report ed.
130 0# $a Time for kids online (News scoop ed.)
250 ## $a News scoop ed.
Do not consider different document formats (e.g. PDF, HTML, etc.) to constitute editions; one
record is used to represent all online formats. Also, do not consider a version statement that
reflects an upgrade of an existing file to be an edition statement.
31.11. Publication, distribution, etc. area (field 260)
Treat all electronic serials as “published” material. Take information regarding the publishing of
a remote access serial from anywhere in the publication, but prefer the chief source. Lacking a
formal presentation on the first or earliest issue, review all other sources for a formal publishing
statement. If the serial lacks a formal statement of publication but it is clear from either internal
or external evidence that it emanates from a particular institution or organization, consider the
institution or organization to be the publisher and the location of the institution or organization to
be the place of publication. Use brackets only when information is taken from an external
source. If no publishing information can be supplied, use “[S.l. : $b s.n.]”. Following the
principles of the aggregator-neutral record, aggregator names are not given in the publishing
statement. Information about the publisher generally would be applicable to all online versions
of the title. Some providers distribute earlier issues of a title, others distribute later issues; there
could be different publishers shown on earlier and later issues of a digitized print serial, so
publishing statements might differ depending on which provider is chosen as the basis of
description.
| When describing from the first or last issue, include the publication date in the subfield $c of
field 260; otherwise, do not record it.
31.12. Physical description (field 300)
| CONSER policy is not to apply the option given in AACR2 9.5B3. There is no physical
| description area (field 300 is not input) for electronic serials in the catalog record. Physical
| characteristics such as sound or graphics can be included in a note, and coded in field 007.
31.13. Series statement and series added entries (fields 4XX/8XX)
Remote access electronic serials. Module 31, page 25
2When format integration made it possible to use fields formerly defined only for electronic resources, CONSER
catalogers agreed to input field 538 as the first field in CONSER records. This practice has been discontinued in
favor of general CONSER practice, which, except for field 533, calls for input in numeric tag order.
CONSER CATALOGING MANUAL Fall 2004
If a remote access serial is issued as part of a series, transcribe the series statement and construct
the added entry according AACR2 and LCRIs (see CCM Module 12 for a summary of appropriate
rules and LCRIs). Make a distinction between the location of a serial on a larger Web site and a
true series statement appearing on issues of the serial. The larger Web site should not necessarily
be recorded as a series. The names of aggregators or distributors should not be recorded as series
titles.
31.14. Notes
The notes area for electronic serials includes information appropriate both to the serial and to the
electronic resource aspects of the publication. Notes on a record for an online version appearing
in multiple e-serial packages should contain information that is applicable to all online versions.
Take into account instructions for notes given in both Chapters 9 and 12 of AARC2. Input notes
in numeric tag order.2 The most relevant notes for remote access serials are:
| Source of title proper (field 500) — see 31.3.4
Variations in title (fields 246, 500) — see 31.7
| Description based on (field 500) — see 31.9; 31.3.4
Latest issue consulted (500) — see 31.9
Beginning and/or ending dates of publication (field 362, indicator 1) — see 31.9
Numbering peculiarities (field 515) — see 31.9
| Mode of access (field 538) — see 31.14.5
| Other physical formats (fields 530, 776) — see 31.14.7
Less frequently used notes for remote access serials are:
Restrictions on access (field 506)
Type of electronic resource or data (field 516)
System requirements (field 538)
Information about documentation (field 556)
31.14.1. Restrictions on access (field 506). Do not use this note unless restrictions apply to all
versions and formats of the serial. An example is a “classified” government document for which
access is always restricted. If specific access restrictions are considered useful in the CONSER
record, give in $z of field 856.
31.14.2. Numbering peculiarities (field 515). Make notes on any numbering or issuing
| peculiarities. Electronic serials may have unusual numbering patterns (cf. CCM 31.9).
Module 31, page 26 Remote access electronic serials
CONSER CATALOGING MANUAL Fall 2004
515 ## $a Successive articles are uniquely identified by a manuscript
number and date.
515 ## $a Articles for 1996 are only available as individual articles,
organized topically.
| 515 ## $a Articles are added to issues on a continuous basis; issues
| are complete after six months.
31.14.3. Type of electronic resource or data (field 516). Field 516 has been used to make
brief notes on the nature and type of remote access electronic serial (AACR2 9.7B1, 9.7B8).
Current CONSER usage of the field is limited to situations where unusual information about file
formats is needed. In a record describing a title offered by multiple providers, file formats should
be applicable to all provider versions. Refer to the CONSER Editing Guide for instructions on
the display constant and use of indicators with this field.
516 8# $a Articles are available in PostScript, TeX, and dvi formats.
| 31.14.4. System requirements (field 538, System details). Make “system requirements” notes
for special software, equipment or operating systems required to capture and/or print the
electronic file (AACR2 9.7B1). Do not use the note unless the requirements are particularly
unusual and apply to all versions offered by multiple providers.
31.14.5. Mode of access (field 538). A “mode of access” note (field 538) must be given in all
records for remote access serials to explain the means by which the serial can be accessed
(AACR2 9.7B1). If more than one issue is available, consult the latest issue for this information.
The mode of access note is one of the “system details” for remote access electronic resources and
is given following the system requirements note, if present. Begin the note with the phrase
“Mode of access:”.
538 ## $a Mode of access: World Wide Web.
Other examples:
538 ## $a Mode of access: Email via electronic mailing list
subscription.
538 ## $a Mode of access: FTP via the Internet.
In addition to field 538, give an 856 field (cf. CCM 31.16) for each of the primary modes of
access, when this information is readily available. Since field 856 is not a note field, some
catalogers give information about access in field 538. For example, GPO often records the
original URL in the 538 field when it adds a PURL to a record (see example below).
Alternatively, depending on local needs and system capabilities, this type of information can be
| given in subfield $z of the 856 field.
Remote access electronic serials. Module 31, page 27
CONSER CATALOGING MANUAL Fall 2004
538 ## $a Mode of access: Internet. Address as of 06/08/01:
http://www.ibb.gov/bbg/report.html; current access is
available via PURL.
856 40 $u http://purl.access.gpo.gov/GPO/LPS4612
31.14.6. Information about documentation (field 556). Make notes regarding documentation
that can be accessed together with the electronic serial. (Refer to the CONSER Editing Guide for
instructions on the display constant and use of indicators with this field.)
556 8# $a Instructions for accessing related graphics in separate
README file.
556 8# $a User’s guide available online via Internet email and FTP
access.
31.14.7. Other physical medium (field 530). Make notes describing the existence of other
medium (e.g., print) in which the serial is issued.
130 0# $a Emerging infectious diseases (Online)
245 10 $a Emerging infectious diseases $h [electronic resource] : $b
EID.
530 ## $a Online version of the print publication.
776 1# $t Emerging infectious diseases $x 1080-6040 $w (DLC)
96648093 $w (OCoLC)31848353
Field 530 is also used in a print record to note the existence of an online version whether or not
the serial is cataloged separately. When the serial is not cataloged separately, field 530 might
also include information concerning special system requirements, restrictions on access, and
general information about the coverage.
530 ## $a Later issues also available on the World Wide Web.
530 ## $a Also available to subscribers via the World Wide Web as:
Hematology and cell therapy electronic edition.
530 ## $a Some issues, including those published under earlier titles,
are accessible from the Census Bureau World Wide Web site.
530 ## $a Beginning with <Mar. 1995> issue also available to
subscribers online via the World Wide Web in PDF format.
31.15. Electronic location and access (field 856)
31.15.1. Description. Field 856 identifies the electronic location of the serial from which it is
available and information needed to access the serial by the method identified by the first
indicator value (email, HTTP, FTP, telnet, dial-up). Information in the field should be sufficient
to connect to a service, transfer files electronically, subscribe, or access issues of an electronic
journal or newsletter. Because this information may change, it is important that it be recorded
from the most recent issue of the serial. For detailed instructions on how to construct the 856
field, see the CONSER Editing Guide. Also helpful are the Guidelines for the use of field 856,
Module 31, page 28 Remote access electronic serials
CONSER CATALOGING MANUAL Fall 2004
http://lcweb.loc.gov/marc/856guide.html, prepared by the Network Development and MARC
Standards Office of the Library of Congress.
Use of this field varies depending on the local catalog system. Some systems use the field as a
“hot link” to connect the user with the online resource through the bibliographic or holdings
record. Other systems generate OPAC displays to enable users to better understand information
presented in the field.
Field 856 has subfields defined to hold a variety of data and instructions. Commonly used
subfields of field 856 are listed below (there is no preferred order of these subfields):
• $u, which holds a Uniform Resource Identifier (URI), such as a URL or URN;
• $3, which contains information that specifies the part of the bibliographic item to which
the field applies, when there is not a fully one-to-one relationship between the 856 and
the resource described in the record; and
• $z, which has a note, intended for public display, related to the electronic location or
identifier in the 856 field.
A. Multiple locations
Deciding which and how many 856 fields to record for an online serial can be a difficult decision
and depends on several factors. These include the number and types of URIs or other access
methods available to the cataloger at the time of cataloging, local policies regarding the
provision of 856 fields, and the need for widely accessible 856 fields on shared OCLC and
CONSER records. Frequently, a cataloger will need to record a different access method locally
| than what is recorded in the CONSER record. The institution may access licensed resources
through unique URIs which other institutions would not be able to use. In general, for the
OCLC/CONSER record, use more widely available access methods in the OCLC record over
methods which provide local institutional access only (an imbedded institutional ID in a URI, for
example). Pages that present the user with a password and user id logon form probably are less
convenient for users than pages that provide direct access to the serial, but sometimes are the
only access methods available for recording in the record. If the content of a serial is spread
over several locations, e.g. early volumes have one URI, later volumes have a different URI, it
might be necessary to add several 856 fields to cover the entire content of the serial. The range
| of issues available from these sites can be given in $3 of the 856 field (see examples below in
CCM 31.15.2).
When there are multiple providers, URIs for each may be given on the aggregator-neutral record.
B. Multiple locations within a site
Often, the problem is having too many access methods from which to choose. Should the
cataloger use a URI which points to a provider’s home page, a specific journal’s home page,
table of contents for all issues of the serial, particular issues of a serial? The site’s structure and
Remote access electronic serials. Module 31, page 29
CONSER CATALOGING MANUAL Fall 2004
the access available on various pages give the cataloger clues in making this decision. Pointing
to a page which gives the user access to all the issues either through a table of contents or search
interface provides access to the serial content without having to navigate several pages. On the
other hand, access to some or all of these pages in publisher or distributor sites may be restricted
to subscribers only. In such cases, it is preferable to point to a higher level page (a journal home
page, for example) which at least provides an unregistered viewer information about the serial,
subscription information, a password prompt, and perhaps sample issues or portions of the serial
that are made available to non-subscribers. It is important to consider the function of pages in the
site design as well. Many publishers provide journal home pages that are intended as a direct
portal to the serial content, clearly identify the title, and may provide longer term stability than
pages at other levels.
C. Mirror sites
With some serials the cataloger is faced with multiple “mirror” sites–alternative locations for
accessing a Web site. Selecting how many of these to record also depends on the limits of the
CONSER record and needs of the cataloging agency in providing access to its constituency.
Providing several sites on a record helps assure an institution’s access when one server is busy or
where agreements between distributors, publishers, etc., make it preferable to provide users with
multiple mirror locations. On the other hand, recording of all possible mirror sites on the
CONSER record may not be practical. Besides the time involved in recording multiple 856
fields, there is a concern that more maintenance is involved if related mirror sites change at the
same time. Ultimately, the decision on how many mirror sites to add to a record should focus on
the needs or policies of the cataloging agency, shaped by the need to provide widely available
access methods on the CONSER record. A cataloging agency, for example, could decide to
record mirror sites in its home country and other mirror sites it deems necessary to assure its
users access. When added to the CONSER record, multiple mirror sites which give identical
access from different locations could be labeled as such:
| 856 40 $z Access from the U.S.: $u http://www.us&#8230;
856 40 $z Access from Europe: $u http://www.europe&#8230;
D. File formats
The 856 field is repeatable in two other ways: 1) if an electronic serial is available by more than
one access method; and 2) if there are multiple file formats with different file names or groups of
files. Separate 856 fields may be needed for each access method (e.g., World Wide Web, email,
etc.) by which the serial is available. Separate 856 fields for document formats may not be
needed because more than one document format is often available from the same access method.
The first indicator of field 856 defines access method; for example, first indicator “4″ shows
access is via HTTP. The second indicator identifies the relationship of the location or identifier
in the 856 field to the item being described in the record as a whole; for example, second
indicator “0″ means the 856 field is for the same resource covered by the record as a whole,
while “1″ indicates the 856 is for an electronic version of the item described in the record.
Module 31, page 30 Remote access electronic serials
CONSER CATALOGING MANUAL Fall 2004
31.15.2. Uses of field 856 in CONSER records. Field 856 is given in CONSER records in the
following circumstances:
1) On the record for a remote access serial to cite the location of that serial. Use second
indicator “0.” In the aggregator-neutral record, URIs of all the providers distributing the
serial are given. If the contents of the serial are split among multiple sites (whether
multiple providers or several locations at one provider site), subfield $3 is used to cite
issues found at a particular location:
856 40 $3 Current issues available from the Publications Page of the
ASA Web site $u http://www.asanet.org/pubs/pubs.html
856 40 $3 Archived issues $u
http://www.asanet.org/footnotes/previous.html
856 40 $3 1994 $u
http://www.computer.org/conferences/sc94/sc94home.html
856 40 $3 1995 $u http://www.supercomp.org/sc95/proceedings/
856 40 $3 1989-1991, 1993-1994 $u
http://www.acm.org/pubs/contents/proceedings/series/sc/
856 40 $3 Abstracts: v.3(1998)-v.4(1999). Full text: v.5(2000)- $u
http://&#8230;
2) On the record for a printed (or other format) serial to cite the location of partial contents
or related information, such as summaries, abstracts, tables of contents, or subscription
information. Subfield $3 should be used to identify the part that is online. Use second
indicator “1” whenever the URI points to any part of the electronic version. This
includes Web sites which give access to some parts of the print material, even if it’s
repackaged in a substantial way. For example, a Web site which gives only the table of
contents of a journal or only abstracts would still be indicator 1 because the site’s content
is essentially a version of the printed material.
856 41 $3 Summaries and index $u http:// …
3) On the record for a printed or other format serial when there is an online version,
regardless of whether the online version is separately cataloged or not. Use second
indicator “1.”
4) For related resources that do not represent the serial cataloged, its online version, or a
part of the serial. Common examples would be an organizational home page or
publisher’s Web site. If an organizational home page contained a 10-year index to a
journal or the tables of contents of several titles, this would be a related Web site. Use
second indicator “2.”
856 42 $3 Home page of the Health Physics Society: $u
http://www.health-physics.com
Remote access electronic serials. Module 31, page 31
CONSER CATALOGING MANUAL Fall 2004
31.15.3. Construction and coding. Depending on the mode of access, different subfields may
be necessary in the 856 field. Subfield $u may be used instead of or in addition to other
subfields.
856 00 $z Email subscription $u mailto:listserv@loc.gov $i subscribe
$f CONSRLIN
For additional guidelines on coding the 856 field see Guidelines for the Use of Field 856 from
Network Development and MARC Standards Office, Library of Congress:
http://lcweb.loc.gov/marc/856guide.html.
31.15.4. Volatility of access information. Without the regular examination of individual issues
which is a natural by-product of check-in and inventory control, the URI for an electronic
publication on a catalog record may quickly become inaccurate. Link checking software run
locally can provide information about broken links but requires regular processing and follow-up
work to determine if changes are needed. Serials management companies also provide
maintenance for URIs as a part of their services for maintaining subscription information for
online serials. Use of persistent identifiers or handle systems is another method to provide a
mechanism for URI maintenance. An example of a persistent identifier is the PURL (persistent
uniform resource locator), which allows libraries to update changes in URIs on a PURL server
without needing to change URLs in catalog records. Link diagnostic notifications from the
OCLC Connexion’s Resource Catalog are another option OCLC libraries have for learning about
changed URIs and making updates.
What should a cataloger do when encountering a record that has institution-specific access
methods recorded in the 856 fields, links that are no longer valid, or links that point to a less than
ideal location? For obvious errors in the access method (for example, if a typo prevents a URI
from working correctly), the cataloger should make corrections. Where it is difficult to
determine the usefulness of an existing access method because of access restrictions, lack of a
| password to logon, uncertainty of whether links are broken temporarily or permanently, etc., it is
best to leave the 856 field on the record and add additional 856 fields. Even for access methods
that appear to be invalid, there may be an advantage to leaving them on the record. The 856
field in many systems, including OCLC, is a searchable field. It is possible for an inactive
| address to give searchers clues about title changes, content changes, and former resource
providers. If the only link appearing on the CONSER record is an invalid link, it can be left on
| the record and labeled as invalid in the subfield $z of the 856 field. Note that the second
| indicator is blank and that the non-working URL is maintained in subfield $u of the 856. This
coding differs from LC practice documented in LCRI 9.7B where the non-working URL is
moved to a subfield z so that it does not appear on LC’s link checking reports repeatedly. The
example below is based on a recommendation from OCLC and is derived from current system
indexing needs and OCLC’s electronic address checking software (see OCLC’s recommendation
at: http://www.oclc.org/support/documentation/worldcat/cataloging/electronicresources/).
856 4# $z Link no longer valid as of Dec. 4, 2000 $u http://www&#8230;
Module 31, page 32 Remote access electronic serials
CONSER CATALOGING MANUAL Fall 2004
31.15.5. PURLs in CONSER records
| PCC institutions are using PURLs in records for free online serials and other online resources.
The successful maintenance of access information for these resources depends on the fact that
the PURL is added to the record and never (except in rare instances where a mistake has been
made or a duplicate PURL assigned) changed or deleted. Therefore CONSER members have
agreed not to delete PURLs found on records.
GPO has been adding PURLs to records for government documents for several years and many
CONSER authenticated records contain them. Current GPO practice is to record the URL of an
online version of a work in the 530 (on a single record approach print record) or in the 538 of the
online publication being cataloged. These notes give the original URL and the date on which a
PURL was established for the title.
| The PCC PURL Project allows participants to cooperatively maintain URLs for freely available
Web resources. A PURL server, hosted by OCLC, is used to enter and maintain URLs.
| Participants receive weekly error reports of changed or broken URLs and make changes to the
| URL stored on the PURL server without needing to change the record; the PURL in the record
will point to the correct changed URL in the PURL server.
| PCC institutions are not required to use the PURL server or to be part of the PCC PURL Project.
| However, those who are cataloging in OCLC are encouraged to create a PURL and add it to the
| OCLC record. Any PCC participant can register on the PURL server; the participant’s OCLC
| authorization number is used for logging on. Documentation and guidelines for the participants
are posted on the project Web site (http://lcweb.loc.gov/acq/conser/purl/main.html). Currently
both the PURL and the URL are being added to the 856, the PURL in the first subfield u and the
URL in a subsequent subfield u. For example:
| 856 4# $u http://bibpurl.oclc.org/web/1022 $u http://www.mihan.net/
31.16. Linking relationships
Identify and treat linking relationships for electronic serials as documented in CCM Module 14.
Provide the appropriate linking fields (and related notes, if necessary) for earlier/later titles,
supplements, and other related works.
245 00 $a I hate computers $h [electronic resource].
780 00 $t Bits & bytes (Gainesville, Fla.) $x 1077-5838 $w (DLC)sn
94002764 $w (OCoLC)30838811
A 530 note and field 776 may be used to link a remote access electronic serial to its other
physical formats (such as print or CD-ROM).
Remote access electronic serials. Module 31, page 33
CONSER CATALOGING MANUAL Fall 2004
130 0# $a Emerging infectious diseases (Online)
245 10 $a Emerging infectious diseases $h [electronic resource] : $b
EID.
530 ## $a Also issued in print.
776 1# $t Emerging infectious diseases $x 1080-6040 $w (DLC)
96648093 $w (OcoLC)31848353
Alternatively, the 776 field can be used to make the linking note, with an explanation given in
subfield $i.
245 00 $a Applied science & technology monthly $h [electronic
resource].
776 08 $i Print version: $t Applied science & technology monthly
31.16.1 Multiple linking relationships
| Multiple linking relationships also occur with remote access serials. When a serial record has
| multiple linking relationships to a single record, the multiple relationships are described in a 580
| note and only one linking entry field (77X/78X) is used to represent the primary relationship.
| The following example demonstrates uses of note and linking fields to describe a situation where
the electronic and print versions were issued simultaneously for some time. The online version
then entirely replaced the print publication. The overlap of issues published simultaneously in
print and online versions is described in the 580 field of the print version.
Record for the print version:
110 2# $a Library and Information Technology Association (U.S.)
245 10 $a LITA newsletter.
362 0# $a No. 1 (winter 1980)-v. 18, no. 4 (fall 1997).
580 ## $a Issues for spring 1995-fall 1997 also available online;
later issues only available online.
785 10 $a Library and Information Technology Association (U.S.). $t
LITA newsletter (Online) $x 1079-123X $w (DLC)sn 94004077 $w
(OCoLC)31406418
Record for the online version:
110 2# $a Library and Information Technology Association (U.S.)
240 10 $a LITA newsletter (Online)
| 245 10 $a LITA newsletter $h [electronic resource].
500 ## $a Description based on: Vol. 16, no. 2 (spring 1995); title
from journal home page (LITA home page, viewed Jan. 13,
1999).
580 ## $a Beginning with winter 1997, issued in online format only.
780 10 $a Library and Information Technology Association (U.S.). $t
LITA newsletter $x 0196-1799 $w (DLC) 84647365 $w
(OCoLC)5757570
31.17. Subject headings and classification
Module 31, page 34 Remote access electronic serials
CONSER CATALOGING MANUAL Fall 2004
Provide the appropriate subject headings, using a standardized list (e.g., LCSH or MeSH),
following the same principles as for print publications as described in CCM Module 15. There is
no form subdivision such as “electronic journals” for remote access electronic resources in
LCSH. From 1999-2001 the term Electronic journals was used in MeSH as a form subdivision.
For LCSH headings, use appropriate subdivisions, as instructed in the Subject Cataloging
| Manual (i.e., H1520 (Databases), H1580.5 (Electronic serials)).
While classification is not required in CONSER records, libraries that normally classify their
serials are encouraged to also classify electronic serials. Though not needed as a location device,
classification provides a useful tool for assessing the types of serials that are online and for many
other purposes.
31.18. Changes that require the creation of new records
When changes in title, personal author, or corporate body main entries occur, create new records
| in accordance with AACR2 and the LCRIs (See also CCM, Module 16). If the physical medium
in which the serial is issued changes (e.g., from print version to electronic version), create a
separate record for the new manifestation of the title in accordance with LCRI 21.3B.
| Sections 31.18.1. and 31.18.2 below provide two approaches to addressing the problem caused
| when a publisher presents content of earlier or later titles on a Web site, but does not present the
| corresponding titles under which the content originally appeared (not even as running titles on
| scanned articles). CONSER prefers to use successive entry cataloging based on current title
| change rules whenever possible for e-serials so that title changes shown on print and online
| version records correspond. Practices for creating successive entry records are covered in
| 31.18.1 which notes that sometimes it may be necessary to use a the print version record as the
| basis of description.
|
| However, the problem can occur for e-serials that have no corresponding print version or
| sometimes a print record is not available as a source of description. There may be other reasons
| when the cataloger judges that it is not desirable to try to make print and online records match, as
| when title changes for the print were created under earlier title change rules, tracking numerous
| title changes in a back file becomes difficult. CONSER guidelines for addressing these cases are
| outlined in 31.18.2 below, following provisions of LCRIs 12.0B1 and 12.7B4.2.
|
| LCRIs 12.0B1 and 12.7B4.2 call for basing the description on the current presentation of the
| title, according to the conventions of integrating entry cataloging. This procedure is also
| followed if the main entry is appropriately a corporate body and that body is not retained on
| earlier issues. In case of corporate body main entry, the description would reflect the current
| body as the main entry.
|
| Following these procedures may involve changing fields in an existing record or creating an
original record that contains the current and earlier titles or bodies. Information about earlier
Remote access electronic serials. Module 31, page 35
CONSER CATALOGING MANUAL Fall 2004
titles is given in fields 247 (former title or former title variations) and, if needed, in 547 (former
title variation complexity). Information about former corporate body main entries is given in
note field 550 and 7XX added entry fields.
| 31.18.1. Create successive entry records
|
| The following examples apply to cases where the content of earlier and later issues are provided
| on a Web site without the title shown on corresponding print versions. Prefer to create successive
| entry records for the electronic version following the pattern of the print records. Base the
| description on records for the print version if necessary:
|
| 130 0# China national journal of new gastroenterology (Online)
| 245 10 [China national journal of new gastroenterology $h
| [electronic resource] = $b Chung-kuo hsin hsiao hua ping
| hs@ueh tsa chih].
| 246 1# $i Online title: $a World journal of gastroenterology
| 500 ## Description based on print version record.
|
| If the cataloger has access to multiple providers and some show the related titles and some don’t,
| prefer the successively presented version as the basis of description and note on the record that
| some providers only issue the title under the latest title (see examples below).
|
| On the record for the later title:
|
| 580 ## Some providers also include earlier title: [earlier title
| entry].
780 10 $t [earlier title entry] $x … $w … ||
| 580 ## Web site also provides access to earlier title: [earlier
| title entry].
780 10 $t [earlier title entry] $x … $w … ||
| 580 ## Includes issues of earlier title: [earlier title entry].
780 10 $t [earlier title entry] $x … $w … ||
| On the record for the earlier title:
|
| 580 ## Available as part of the Web site of the later title: [later
| title entry].
785 10 $t [later title entry] $x … $w … ||
| 580 ## Issues listed under the Web site of the later title: [later
| title entry].
785 10 $t [later title entry] $x … $w … ||
| 580 ## Some providers make available from the later title Web site:
| [later title entry].
| 785 10 $t [later title entry] $x … $w …
|
| 31.18.2. Successive records cannot be created
Module 31, page 36 Remote access electronic serials
CONSER CATALOGING MANUAL Fall 2004
| When there are no print records for the earlier (or later) title or it is unclear whether the print and
| online versions carry the same successive titles, follow LCRI 12.7B4.2, “… give the earlier title
| in a note. Give a note explaining that the earlier title no longer appears in the serial.”
| A. Updating existing records
|
The cataloger finds the following record and notices that all issues have been reformatted with
the new title in the online archive.
Biblvl= s
Entry convention = 0
Type of continuing resource= p
245 00 $a BMC biochemistry and structural biology $h [electronic
resource].
260 ## $a London : $b BioMed Central, $c 2000-
362 0# $a Vol. 1 (2000)-
500 ## $a Title from BioMed Central archive volume screen (viewed Dec.
6, 2002).
856 40 $u http://bibpurl.oclc.org/web/213 $u
http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcbiochem/
856 40 $u http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/tocrender.fcgi?journal=12
Record as updated by cataloger:
• Entry convention is changed to: 2
• The 245 is changed to the current title.
• The earlier title and what is known about the dates it carried is put into field 247.
If needed for clarification, a former title complexity note, 547 is added to explain
the change in title.
• In this case, the original title split into two different titles as reflected in the 547
note.
• The description is based on the current issue
Biblvl= s
Entry convention = 2
Type of continuing resource= p
245 00 $a BMC biochemistry $h [electronic resource].
247 11 $a BMC biochemistry and structural biology
260 ## $a London : $b BioMed Central, $c 2000-
362 0# $a Vol. 1 (2000)-
Remote access electronic serials. Module 31, page 37
CONSER CATALOGING MANUAL Fall 2004
500 ## $a Title from BioMed Central archive volume screen (viewed Dec.
6, 2002).
547 ## $a Originally titled: BMC biochemistry and structural biology.
Original title was split into: BMC biochemistry, and: BMC
structural biology. A new web site was created for BMC
structural biology and all articles were reformatted with
the later titles.
If further changes take place and earlier known titles or bodies continue to be reformatted or
omitted, the description is changed to reflect the current issue. Earlier information is explained in
the 547 or 550 notes and added entries are provided. If on the other hand, a later change occurs
and the publisher does begin to retain earlier titles or bodies, a new successive entry record is
created and the two records are linked.
Continuing the example above hypothetically, a further change occurs and the publisher retains
the earlier titles. The record is closed out:
Biblvl= s
Entry convention = 2
Type of continuing resource= p
Publication status=d
245 00 $a BMC biochemistry $h [electronic resource].
| 247 11 $a BMC biochemistry and structural biology
260 ## $a London : $b BioMed Central, $c 2000-2003.
362 0# $a Vol. 1 (2000)-v. 4 (2003).
500 ## $a Title from BioMed Central archive volume screen (viewed Dec.
6, 2002).
547 ## $a Originally titled: BMC biochemistry and structural biology.
Original title was split into: BMC biochemistry, and: BMC
structural biology. A new web site was created for BMC
structural biology and all articles were reformatted with
the later titles. This serial is now continued by: BMC
biochemistry and metabolic pathways.
785 10 $t BMC biochemistry and metabolic pathways
856 40 $u http://bibpurl.oclc.org/web/213 $u
http://www.biomedcentral.com/bmcbiochem/
A new record is created:
245 00 $a BMC biochemistry and metabolic pathways $h [electronic
resource].
780 00 $t BMC biochemistry
| B. Creating a new record
|
If there is not an existing record for an earlier title and the cataloger is creating an original record
that would cover issues that are known to have had that title, the earlier title can be given in a
247 field and an explanation in a 547 field.
Module 31, page 38 Remote access electronic serials
CONSER CATALOGING MANUAL Fall 2004
Example: At the time of cataloging, there is no existing record on the utilities for the earlier title
but the span of time issues of the serial had the earlier title is known:
| 245 00 $a RFE/RL newsline $h [electronic resource].
| 247 11 $a Newsline on the Web $f 1 Apr. 1997-<1 Oct. 1997>
260 ## $a Prague : $b RFE/RL, Inc., $c c1997-
500 ## $a Description based on: Vol. 6, no. 57 (26 Mar. 2002); title
from caption (viewed Mar. 26, 2002).
547 ## $a All issues originally published with the title: Newsline on
the Web have been reformatted with the new title: RFE/RL
Newsline.
31.19 ISSN for online serials
Recording the ISSN displayed on the serial is useful for searching and record matching on local
systems, citation indexes, and full text databases. The centers of the ISSN Network currently
assign separate ISSN to paper and online versions of a serial; however, not all online versions
| have been assigned a separate ISSN by the appropriate center. If separate ISSN have been
assigned, sometimes ISSN for both the print and online versions are displayed on issues of the eserial
or in related pages on the serial’s Web site.
When print and online format ISSN are given (sometimes clearly labeled “print” and “E-ISSN”),
record the ISSN for online version in $a of the 022 and record the ISSN for the print in $y of the
022. If the publisher appears to be printing the ISSN of the print instead of a separate ISSN for
the online format, record the ISSN of the print in $y of the 022. If unsure which format the ISSN
is for, record it in $y. If the serial does not print an ISSN but one format’s ISSN, or both are
known, they may be placed in the appropriate subfields of the 022.
31.20. Record examples
31.20.1. Born digital e-serial (there is no print version). Statistical Applications in Genetics and
Molecular Biology
OCLC: 31848943 Rec stat: c
Entered: 19950118 Replaced: 19970422 Used: 19970917
Type: a ELvl: Srce: c Gpub: Ctrl: Lang: eng
BLvl: s Form: s Conf: 0 Freq: a MRec: Ctry: cau
S/L: 0 Orig: s EntW: Regl: r ISSN: 1 Alph: a
Desc: a SrTp: Cont: DtSt: c Dates: 2002,9999
010 ## $a 2003-212268 $z 2003-243230
006 [m d ]
007 $a c $b r $d c $e n $f u
012 ## $l 1
016 7# $a 101176023 $2 DNLM
019 ## $a 52166607
022 0# $a 1544-6115
030 ## $a SAGMCU
037 ## $b BE Press, 805 Camelia St., Berkeley, CA 94710 $c $365.00
042 ## $a nsdp $a lcd
050 10 $a ISSN RECORD
050 14 $a QH438.4.S73
Remote access electronic serials. Module 31, page 39
CONSER CATALOGING MANUAL Fall 2004
060 10 $a W1
082 10 $a 576.5 $2 13
210 0# $a Stat. appl. genet. mol. biol.
222 #0 $a Statistical applications in genetics and molecular biology
245 00 $a Statistical applications in genetics and molecular biology
$h [electronic resource].
246 13 $a SAGMB
260 ## $a [Berkeley, CA] : $b Berkeley Electronic Press, $c c2002-
310 ## $a Annual
362 0# $a Vol. 1, issue 1 (2002)-
| 500 ## $a Title from table of contents page (publisher’s Web site,
viewed July 24, 2003).
500 ## $a Latest issue consulted: Vol. 2, issue 1 (2003)(viewed July
24, 2003).
515 ## $a Articles added consecutively to current annual volume.
538 ## $a Mode of access: World Wide Web.
510 0# $a Chemical abstracts $x 0009-2258
650 #0 $a Genetics $x Statistical methods $v Periodicals.
650 #0 $a Molecular biology $x Statistical methods $v Periodicals.
650 #0 $a Bioinformatics $v Periodicals.
650 12 $a Genetics $v Periodicals.
650 22 $a Molecular Biology $v Periodicals.
650 22 $a Statistics $v Periodicals.
856 40 $u http://www.bepress.com/sagmb
850 ## $a DNLM
Module 31, page 40 Remote access electronic serials
CONSER CATALOGING MANUAL Fall 2004
31.20.2. Aggregator-neutral record. Journal of Cereal Science (Online)
| Type: a ELvl: Srce: c GPub: Ctrl: Lang: eng
BLvl: s Form: s Conf: 0 Freq: b MRec: Ctry: enk
S/L: 0 Orig: s EntW: Regl: r ISSN: 1 Alph: a
Desc: a SrTp: p Cont: DtSt: c Dates: 1983,9999
010 ## $a sn97-1881
006 [m d ]
007 $a c $b r $d c $e n $f u
012 $l 1
022 0# $a 1095-9963 $y 0733-5210
037 ## $b Academic Press, 6277 Sea Harbor Dr., Orlando, FL 32887-4900
042 ## $a nsdp $a lcd
082 10 $a 664 $2 12
130 0# $a Journal of cereal science (Online)
210 0# $a J. cereal sci. $b (Online)
222 #0 $a Journal of cereal science $b (Online)
245 10 $a Journal of cereal science $h [electronic resource].
246 30 $a Cereal science
260 ## $a London : $b Academic Press
310 ## $a Bimonthly
362 1# $a Print began with: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 1983).
500 ## $a Description based on: Vol. 17, issue 1 (Jan. 1993); title
from table of contents (ScienceDirect, viewed Sept. 5, 2003).
530 ## $a Online version of the print title: Journal of cereal
science.
538 ## $a Mode of access: World Wide Web.
650 #0 $a Grain $v Periodicals.
650 #0 $a Cereal products $v Periodicals.
776 1# $t Journal of cereal science $x 0733-5210 $w (DLC)sn 82005265
$w (OCoLC)8603019
856 40 $u http://firstsearch.oclc.org $z Address for accessing the
journal using authorization number and password through OCLC
FirstSearch Electronic Collections Online
856 40 $u
http://firstsearch.oclc.org/journal=0733-5210;screen=info;ECOI
P $z Address for accessing the journal from an authorized IP
address through OCLC FirstSearch Electronic Collections Online
856 40 $u http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/07335210
Remote access electronic serials. Module 31, page 41
CONSER CATALOGING MANUAL Fall 2004
31.20.3. Single-record approach. ARC News (Redlands, Calif.)
OCLC: 20316854 Rec stat: c
Entered: 19890908 Replaced: 19970902 Used: 19970903
| Type: a ELvl: Srce: c GPub: Ctrl: Lang: eng
BLvl: s Form: Conf: 0 Freq: q MRec: Ctry: cau
S/L: 0 Orig: EntW: Regl: r ISSN: 1 Alph: a
Desc: a SrTp: p Cont: DtSt: c Dates: 19uu,9999
010 ## $a sn91-17504
012 ## $i 9106 $l 1
022 0# $a 1064-6108
037 ## $b Environmental Systems Research Institute, Inc., 380 New
York Street, Redlands, CA 92373
042 ## $a lc $a nsdp
050 00 $a G70.2 $b .A73
082 10 $a 363 $2 12
130 0# $a ARC news (Redlands, Calif.)
210 0# $a ARC news $b (Redlands Calif.)
222 #0 $a ARC news $b (Redlands, Calif.)
245 10 $a ARC news / $c Environmental Systems Research Institute.
| 246 1# $i At head of title: $a ESRI $f <winter 1997/98->
246 17 $a ESRI ARC news
| 260 ## $a Redlands, Calif. : $b Environmental Systems Research
| Institute
300 ## $a v. : $b ill. ; $c 43 cm.
310 ## $a Quarterly, $b <spring 1989->
321 ## $a Two issues a year, $b <summer/fall 1987->
| 500 ## $a Some issues include section: GIS trends.
500 ## $a Description based on: Summer/fall 1987; title from caption.
| 500 ## $a Latest issue consulted: Vol. 23, no. 4 (winter 2001/2002).
515 ## $a Vols. for <summer/fall 1987-winter/spring 1988> lack
numbering designation; <fall 1989-> called <vol. 11, no. 2->
530 ## $a Recent issues are also available on the Internet.
650 #0 $a Geographic information systems $v Periodicals.
650 #0 $a Geography $x Data processing $v Periodicals.
710 2# $a Environmental Systems Research Institute (Redlands, Calif.)
740 02 $a GIS trends.
856 41 $u http://bibpurl.oclc.org/web/2645 $u
http://www.esri.com/news/arcnews/arcnews.html
| 891 20 $9 853 $8 3 $a v. $b no. $u 4 $v r $i (year/year) $j (season)
$w q
| 891 41 $9 863 $8 3.1 $a <23> $b <4> $i <2001/2002> $j <24>
Module 31, page 42 Remote access electronic serials
CONSER CATALOGING MANUAL Fall 2004
| 31.20.4. Online version preceded by an earlier title. Journal of physiology and pharmacology (Online)
|
| OCLC: 49792853 Rec stat: C
| Entered: 20020515 Replaced: 20040615 Used: 20041111
| Type: a ELvl: Srce: c GPub: Ctrl: Lang: eng
| BLvl: s Form: s Conf: 0 Freq: q MRec: Ctry: pl
| S/L: 0 Orig: s EntW: Regl: r ISSN: Alph:
| Desc: a SrTp: p Cont: DtSt: c Dates: 1991,9999
| 010 ## $a 2004-262222
| 006 [m d ]
| 007 $a c $b r $d c $e n
| 022 0# $y 0867-5910
| 042 ## $a lcd
| 130 0# $a Journal of physiology and pharmacology (Online)
| 245 10 $a Journal of physiology and pharmacology $h [electronic
| resource] : $b an official journal of the Polish
| Physiological Society.
| 260 ## $a Krak3ow, Poland : $b Polish Physiological Society, $c
| [1991]-
| 310 ## $a Quarterly
| 362 1# $a Print began with: Vol. 42, no. 1 (Mar. 1991).
| 500 ## $a Description based on: Vol. 51, no. 1 (Mar. 2000);
| title from journal information screen (publisher’s Web
| site, viewed June 4, 2004).
| 500 ## $a Latest issue consulted: Vol. 55, no. 1, pt. 1 (Mar. 2004).
| 530 ## $a Also issued in print.
| 538 ## $a Mode of access: World Wide Web.
| 580 ## $a Original print version of this title was preceded by
| an earlier title called: Acta physiologica Polonica.
| 650 #0 $a Physiology $v Periodicals.
| 650 #0 $a Pharmacology $v Periodicals.
| 650 #2 $a Pharmacology $v Periodicals.
| 650 #2 $a Physiology $v Periodicals.
| 710 2# $a Polskie Towarzystwo Fizjologiczne.
| 776 1# $t Journal of physiology and pharmacology $x 0867-5910
| $w
| (DLC)940646692 $w (OCoLC)24515696
| 780 10 $t Acta physiologica Polonica {note suppressed; record control
| number not input}
| 856 40 $z Access v.51(2000)- $u
| http://bibpurl.oclc.org/web/7757 $u
| http://www.jpp.krakow.pl/
Remote access electronic serials. Module 31, page 43
CONSER CATALOGING MANUAL Fall 2004
| References:
AACR2/LCRIs: Chapters 1, 9, and 12
Appendix D, Glossary
CONSER Editing Guide: Section E. Technical Guidelines
Appendix N. Special Physical Formats
Krol, Ed. Adapted by Bruce Klopfenstein. The Whole Internet User’s Guide & Catalog. Academic
ed. Belmont, Calif. : Integra Media Group, c1996. (Cited as Krol)
Guidelines for the Use of Field 856. Prepared by the Network Development and MARC Standards
| Office, Library of Congress. Rev. Mar. 2003. URL: http://www.loc.gov/marc/856guide.html
NetLingo Dictionary of Internet Words: A Glossary of Online Jargon with Definitions of Terminology
& Acronyms. NetLingo, Inc., c1995-2000. URL: http://www.netlingo.com (Cited as NetLingo)
The Word Spy. Logophilia, Ltd., c1995-2003. URL: http://www.wordspy.com/
Additional resources:
Source of Title Note for Internet Resources. Online Audiovisual Catalogers Cataloging Policy
| Committee, Second Revision, 2004. URL: http://www.uwm.edu/People/mll/stnir-2.html
|
BIBCO Participants Manual. Appendix A, Integrating Resources, a Cataloging Manual. Program for
| Cooperative Cataloging. Aug. 2003. URL:
http://www.loc.gov/catdir/pcc/bibco/irman.pdf
| Counter Code of Practice. 3, Definitions of Terms Used. COUNTER. Dec. 2002. URL:
http://www.projectcounter.org/code_practice.html
Description of Entities and Elements for the Electronic Resources Management Initiative. Data
Elements and Definitions. The Digital Library Federation Electronic Resource Management Initiative,
| Data Elements and Definitions Working Group. July 18, 2003. URL:
http://www.library.cornell.edu/cts/elicensestudy/dlfdeliverables/home.htm
Guidelines for Coding Electronic Resources in Leader/06. Prepared by the Network Development and
| MARC Standards Office, Library of Congress. URL:
| http://www.loc.gov/marc/ldr06guide.html
| Weitz, Jay. Cataloging Electronic Resources: OCLC-MARC Coding Guidelines. URL:
| http://www.oclc.org/support/documentation/worldcat/cataloging/electronicresources/
Module 31, page 44 Remote access electronic serials
CONSER CATALOGING MANUAL Fall 2004
Definitions of terms used in this module
Aggregator. A company that provides digitized access to the content of many different
serials and other resources, often from a variety of different publishers. Aggregators may also
be called by other terms, including but not limited to: distributors, vendors, or secondary
publishers. Aggregators provide access to digitized material through a searchable database.
Generally the collections that aggregators produce fall into two different categories: those that
provide access to complete issues of serials and those that contain the text of selected
articles from serial issues. (CCM)
Aggregator database. The searchable collection of digitized material produced by an
aggregator. (CCM)
Aggregator-neutral record. A catalog record representing all versions of a resource made
available by multiple online providers. (CCM)
Anonymous FTP (File Transfer Protocol). Allows retrieval of electronic resources from a
remote site without requiring a user ID or password. (CCM)
ASCII. American Standard Code for Information Interchange. A standard character-tonumber
encoding scheme used widely in the computing industry. The term “ASCII” is also
used to refer to electronic files that consist only of plain text. (CCM)
Bibliographic resource. An expression or manifestation of a work or an item that forms the
basis for bibliographic description. A bibliographic resource may be tangible or intangible.
(AACR2)
| Blog. A Web site (or section of a Web site) where users can post a chronological, up-to-date
entry of their thoughts. Basically, it is an open forum communication tool that, depending on
| the Web site, is either very individualistic or performs a crucial function for a company.
(Netlingo)
Born-digital. An adjective describing a document that was created and exists only in digital
format. (The Word Spy)
Browsers. Software programs for reading hypertext documents. Browsers are mounted
locally either on site for terminal mode or on the user’s PC. Netscape, Internet Explorer, and
Lynx are examples of hypertext browsers used to view World Wide Web documents.
Netscape and Internet Explorer are graphical browsers, Windows- or Mac-based; Lynx is a
text-only terminal mode browser. They all allow a user to read and follow hypertext links
specified in a document. They vary in their ability to handle graphic or sound files. (CCM)
Client. A software application that works on your behalf to extract a service from a server
somewhere on the network. (Krol)
Computer file. See Electronic resource.
Remote access electronic serials. Module 31, page 45
CONSER CATALOGING MANUAL Fall 2004
Continuing resource. A bibliographic resource that is issued over time with no
predetermined conclusion. Continuing resources include serials and ongoing integrating
resources. (AACR2)
Direct access (Electronic resources). The use of electronic resources via carriers (e.g.,
discs/disks, cassettes, cartridges) designed to be inserted into a computerized device
or its auxiliary equipment. (AACR2)
Electronic mailing list. Internet software that automatically processes commands in an
email forum environment. It provides for automatic mailing of electronic serial issues to
subscribers and handles messages sent to and from discussion lists. (CCM)
Electronic resource. Material (data and/or program(s)) encoded for manipulation by a
computerized device. This material may require the use of a peripheral directly connected
to a computerized device (e.g., CD-ROM drive) or a connection to a computer
network (e.g., the Internet). (AACR2)
Email (electronic mail). A ystem whereby a computer user can exchange messages with
other computer users (or groups of users) via a communications network utilizing a
| standardized protocol. Some electronic journals are available via electronic mail
subscriptions, either through an electronic mailing list or by direct email from the distributor of
the serial. (CCM)
| File (Electronic resources). A basic unit in which electronic resources are organized and
stored. Electronic resources can contain one or more files. See also Electronic resource.
FTP (File Transfer Protocol). A rotocol that defines how to transfer files from one computer
to another; also the access method used to move files from a remote location to a local site
for use. To retrieve files, the user initiates an FTP session by logging into a remote host
computer, changing to the desired directory, and retrieving the files. (CCM)
Gateway. A computer system that transfers data between normally incompatible applications
or networks. It reformats the data so that it is acceptable for the new network (or application)
before passing it on. (CCM)
Home page (e-serials). The hypertext document that serves as the “preface” for a service or
publication mounted on the World Wide Web. It is normally an introductory screen that
provides general information about the institution maintaining the site, or a publication or
group of publications available. Hypertext links are included to access specific documents or
files archived at the site. (CCM)
Host computer. A computer, also called a node, that directly provides service to a user.
(CCM)
Host name. The address of the host computer on which a remote-access electronic resource
resides. (CCM)
HTML (Hypertext Markup Language). A subset of Standard Generalized Markup Language
(SGML). The language in which World Wide Web documents are written. (CCM)
Module 31, page 46 Remote access electronic serials
CONSER CATALOGING MANUAL Fall 2004
HTML header. Refers to the HEAD element of HTML source code specifications. The HEAD
element contains information about the current document, such as the TITLE element and
keywords that may be useful to search engines, and other data that is not considered
document content. The TITLE element can be displayed separately from the document in the
browser title bar. (CCM)
HTML header title. The title displayed in the title element of the HTML HEAD portion of an
HTML document, sometimes used interchangeably with Source code title. See also Source
code title. (CCM)
HTML source. The underlying source code for an HTML document. It includes HTML
elements such as the HEAD, BODY, TITLE, and other coding which gives information about
the document and/or determines how a document is displayed in a browser. (CCM)
Hypertext Transfer Protocol (http). Method of presenting information in which selected
words or other document elements, when chosen, execute automatic links to related
documents or files. The linked documents on the World Wide Web may contain graphics,
sound, or even moving images. (CCM)
Integrating resource. A bibliographic resource that is added to or changed by means of
updates that do not remain discrete and are integrated into the whole. Integrating resources
can be finite or continuing. Examples of integrating resources include updating loose-leafs
and updating Web sites. (AACR2)
Internet. The world-wide “network of networks” that are connected to each other, using the IP
protocol and other similar protocols. The Internet provides file transfer, remote login,
electronic mail, news, and other services. (Krol)
IP (Internet Protocol). The most important of the protocols on which the Internet is based. It
allows a packet to traverse multiple networks on the way to its final destination. Often, this is
used in conjunction with TCP (Transmission Control Protocol), as in TCP/IP. (Krol)
IP address. The Internet Protocol or numeric address of a computer connected to the
Internet. It consists of four numbers separated by periods. (CCM)
Link resolver. Server software that accepts citations to articles and other items (often
formatted according to OpenURL standard) and uses a context sensitive link to connect
| users to designated target resources such as full-text repositories, A&I, and citation
| databases, online library catalogs, and other Web resources and services. (CCM)
Mirror site. An alternative URI for accessing an electronic resource. A mirror site might
provide users in a particular geographic location better access than other URIs associated
with the resource.
PDF. Portable Document Format. The file format of documents viewed and created by the
Adobe Acrobat Reader, Acrobat Capture, Adobe Distiller, Adobe Exchange, and the Adobe
Acrobat Amber Plug-in for Netscape Navigator. This file format was developed to standardize
formatting of documents that are used on the Internet. (NetLingo)
Remote access electronic serials. Module 31, page 47
CONSER CATALOGING MANUAL Fall 2004
Protocol. A mutually-determined set of formats and procedures governing the exchange of
information between different kinds of computers. (CCM)
Provider. A general term used throughout this module to refer to any company, publisher, or
aggregator enabling access to digitized text. (CCM)
Remote access (electronic resources). The use of electronic resources via computer
networks. (AACR2)
SGML (Standard Generalized Markup Language). A standard for formatting textual
documents so that they can be read by different document processing tools. (CCM)
Server. Software that allows a computer to offer a service to another computer. Other
computers contact the server program by means of matching client software. Also, the
computer on which the server software runs is often called the “server.” (CCM)
Source code. The form in which a computer program or Web site is written. On the
Internet, for example, the source code for a Web page could contain any of
the following languages: HTML, JavaScript, Java, or SGML. (NetLingo)
Source code title. Generally refers to the title element appearing in the underlying source
code of a document. See also HTML header title. (CCM)
TCP (Transmission Control Protocol). One of the protocols on which the Internet is based
(a connection-oriented reliable protocol). Often used in combination with IP (Internet
Protocol) as in TCP/IP. (Krol)
Telnet. The Internet protocol for remote terminal connection service. Telnet allows a user at
one site to log in and interact with a system at another site just as if the user’s terminal were
connected directly to the remote computer. (CCM)
Title bar. The colored bar at the top of each window that displays the program and file
names. (NetLingo)
Title screen (Electronic resources). In the case of an electronic resource, a display of data
that includes the title proper and usually, though not necessarily, the statement of
responsibility and the data relating to publication. (AACR2)
URI. Uniform Resource Identifier. Provides a standard syntax for locating files using existing
Internet protocols as in a Uniform Resource Locator (URL) or by resolution of a Uniform
| Resource Name (URN). (CCM)
URL. Uniform Resource Locator. Location information of an electronic resource expressed in
a standardized format, which allows for electronic resources to be sent and received
automatically. The World Wide Web uses the URL as the basis of linking to other files and
| documents around the Internet. A URL can be identified by a protocol such as “http.” (CCM)
Module 31, page 48 Remote access electronic serials
CONSER CATALOGING MANUAL Fall 2004
URN. Uniform Resource Name. A URI that has an institutional commitment to persistence,
availability, etc. A particular scheme, identified by the initial string “urn:”, that is intended to
serve as a persistent, location-independent, resource identifier. (CCM)
Usenet News. Separate from the Internet but available with many Internet accounts, it’s a
worldwide set of over 12,000 bulletin boards, called “newsgroups.” Software called a
“newsreader” is used to read and post. (CCM)
Userid. Sometimes called “user name,” userid is short for “user identification.” This precedes
the @ sign in an email address. (CCM)
World Wide Web (WWW). A hypertext-based system for locating and accessing Internet
resources which presents materials to the user in the form of interlinked documents (which
can include text, images, and digitized sound). (CCM)
Weblog. See Blog.
XML. eXtensible Markup Language. XML is a pared-down version of SGML, designed
especially for Web documents. It enables Web authors and Web developers to create their
own customized tags to provide functionality not available with HTML. (NetLingo)
Remote access electronic serials. Module 31, page 49
CONSER CATALOGING MANUAL Fall 2004

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